File(s) stored somewhere else

Please note: Linked content is NOT stored on CQUniversity and we can't guarantee its availability, quality, security or accept any liability.

Young people who purchase loot boxes are more likely to have gambling problems: An online survey of adolescents and young adults living in NSW Australia

journal contribution
posted on 20.07.2021, 23:11 by Matthew Rockloff, Alexander Russell, Nancy Greer, Lisa Lole, Nerilee Hing, Matthew Browne
Background and aims: Loot boxes are a common feature in video games where players win, buy or are gifted a virtual box or other container that is unwrapped to reveal virtual items of value, such as skins, weapons, in-game currency or special abilities. The current study aimed to relate the use of loot boxes to gambling problems and harm. Methods: An online survey was conducted with 1,954 adolescents and young adults from NSW Australia, 59.9% female (aged 12-24), recruited by online panel aggregator, Qualtrics. Results: Buying and selling loot boxes was associated with higher 12-month gambling frequency and gambling problems in young adults, aged 18-24 (Problem Gambling Severity Index). Young adults who bought loot boxes additionally had more gambling-related harms (Short Gambling Harms Screen). Young women, aged 18-24, who opened, bought and/or sold loot boxes spent more money in the last 12 months on gambling. In adolescents, aged 12-17, buying loot boxes was similarly associated with gambling problems (DSM-IV-MR-J). Furthermore, adolescent girls who bought and/or sold loot boxes viewed gambling more positively than other girls (Attitudes Towards Gambling Scale). There was no evidence, however, that longer-term experience in opening or purchasing loot boxes, a differentiating feature of the survey, is associated with current gambling problems. Discussion and conclusions: This study suggests that loot boxes may be attractive to people who are already predisposed to engage in other gambling, and females who use loot boxes may have unique vulnerabilities to gambling problems that could be explored in future research.

Funding

Category 2 - Other Public Sector Grants Category

History

Volume

10

Issue

1

Start Page

35

End Page

41

Number of Pages

7

eISSN

2063-5303

ISSN

2062-5871

Location

Hungary

Publisher

Akadémiai Kiadó

Additional Rights

CC BY-NC 4.0

Language

eng

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

Yes

Acceptance Date

18/01/2021

Era Eligible

Yes

Medium

Print-Electronic

Journal

Journal of Behavioral Addictions

Usage metrics

CQUniversity

Exports