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Working with an Aboriginal community to understand drinking water perceptions and acceptance in rural New South Wales

journal contribution
posted on 16.05.2018, 00:00 by FG Jaravani, PD Massey, Jennifer JuddJennifer Judd, KA Taylor, J Allan, N Allan, DN Durrheim, M Oelgemoeller
This study explored the Walhallow Aboriginal community's experiences with drinking water to gain a shared understanding about community concerns and to develop ways to address these concerns together. There is a strong connection between people and water, as well as a need to appreciate the social factors associated with the unique cultural and socioeconomic factors that the provision of drinking water has for Aboriginal communities. We used a mixed method design within a community-based participatory action Research (PAR) framework. Water hardness and parental influence were the key factors associated with participants' decisions to drink rainwater. This study provides important insights for water supply authorities when assessing health risks and when choosing appropriate mitigation measures for water quality improvement programs in Aboriginal communities. © 2017, Western University.

History

Volume

8

Issue

3

Start Page

1

End Page

32

Number of Pages

32

eISSN

1916-5781

Publisher

Western University, Canada

Additional Rights

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

Yes

Cultural Warning

This research output may contain the names and images of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people now deceased. We apologize for any distress that may occur.

External Author Affiliations

Walhallow Local Aboriginal Land Council, NSW; Population Health, Hunter New England Local Health District, NSW; James Cook University

Author Research Institute

Centre for Indigenous Health Equity Research

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

International Indigenous Policy Journal