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Working time society consensus statements: Evidence-based effects of shift work and non-standard working hours on workers, family and community

journal contribution
posted on 08.05.2020, 00:00 by A Arlinghaus, P Bohle, I Iskra-Golec, N Jansen, Sarah Jay, L Rotenberg
Working time arrangements that require shift work or other non-standard working hours have significant potential to encroach on time that is highly valued for family, social and leisure activity. This can often result in workers experiencing poorer work-family or work-life balance. Based on an extensive literature search and expert knowledge, primary risk factors were identified including shift work; long, irregular and unpredictable working hours; and work on evenings and weekends (in combination and independent of shift work). On the other hand, flexibility, in the form of adequate worker control over work schedules, may be a protective factor. In addition, workers experiencing excessive work-life conflict are likely to reduce their working hours, reflecting a reciprocal relationship between working hours and work-life balance. Workers’ families are also affected by shift work and non-standard working hours. Parents’ shift work is associated with poorer emotional and developmental outcomes for their children, and to a greater likelihood of risky behavior in adolescence. Additionally, the risk of separation or divorce is increased, especially for parents working night shifts. Due to relationships such as those above, the consequences of shiftwork and non-standard working hours on family and social life are largely dependent on a complex interaction between specific work schedules, other aspects of work organization, and family and individual worker characteristics. This article provides an overview of current evidence regarding the relationships between working time arrangements and various social and family variables, and concludes with shift scheduling and intervention recommendations to improve work-life balance and social well-being. © 2019 National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health.

History

Volume

57

Issue

2

Start Page

184

End Page

200

Number of Pages

17

eISSN

1880-8026

ISSN

0019-8366

Publisher

National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health

Additional Rights

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

Yes

Acceptance Date

21/08/2018

External Author Affiliations

Oswaldo Cruz Institute, Brazil; Maastricht University, The Netherlands; XIMES GmbH, Austria; SWPS University of Social Sciences and Humanities, Poland

Author Research Institute

Appleton Institute

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

Industrial Health