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Who is more likely to use the Internet for health behavior change? A cross-sectional survey of Internet use among smokers and nonsmokers who are orthopedic trauma patients

journal contribution
posted on 20.06.2018, 00:00 by S McCrabb, AL Baker, J Attia, ZJ Balogh, N Lott, K Palazzi, J Naylor, IA Harris, Christopher DoranChristopher Doran, J George
BACKGROUND: eHealth presents opportunities to provide population groups with accessible health interventions, although knowledge about Internet access, peoples' interest in using the Internet for health, and users' characteristics are required prior to eHealth program development. OBJECTIVE: This study surveyed hospital patients to examine rates of Internet use, interest in using the Internet for health, and respondent characteristics related to Internet use and interest in using the Internet for health. For patients who smoke, preferences for types of smoking cessation programs for use at home and while in hospital were also examined. METHODS: An online cross-sectional survey was used to survey 819 orthopedic trauma patients (response rate: 72.61%, 819/1128) from two public hospitals in New South Wales, Australia. Logistic regressions were used to examine associations between variables. RESULTS: A total of 72.7% (574/790) of respondents had at least weekly Internet access and more than half (56.6%, 357/631) reported interest in using the Internet for health. Odds of at least weekly Internet usage were higher if the individual was born overseas (OR 2.21, 95% CI 1.27-3.82, P=.005), had a tertiary education (OR 3.75, 95% CI 2.41-5.84, P<.001), or was a nonsmoker (OR 3.75, 95% CI 2.41-5.84, P<.001). Interest in using the Internet for health increased with high school (OR 1.85, 95% CI 1.09-3.15, P=.02) or tertiary education (OR 2.48, 95% CI 1.66-3.70, P<.001), and if household incomes were more than AUS $100,000 (OR 2.5, 95% CI 1.25-4.97, P=.009). Older individuals were less interested in using the Internet for health (OR 0.98, 95% CI 0.97-0.99, P<.001). CONCLUSIONS: Online interventions may be a potential tool for health care in this hospitalized population. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR): ACTRN12614001147673; https://www.anzctr.org.au/Trial/Registration/TrialReview.aspx?id=366829&isReview=true (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6qg26u3En).

Funding

Other

History

Volume

4

Issue

2

Start Page

1

End Page

14

Number of Pages

14

ISSN

2368-7959

Location

Canada

Additional Rights

CC BY 4.0

Language

eng

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

Yes

Acceptance Date

21/04/2017

External Author Affiliations

Hunter New England Population Health; Monash University; University of New South Wales; Liverpool Hospital, NSW; John Hunter Hospital, NSW; University of Newcastle

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

JMIR Ment Health

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