CQUniversity
Browse

File(s) stored somewhere else

Please note: Linked content is NOT stored on CQUniversity and we can't guarantee its availability, quality, security or accept any liability.

What people really think about safety around horses: The relationship between risk perception, values and safety behaviours

journal contribution
posted on 2021-03-23, 23:28 authored by Meredith ChapmanMeredith Chapman, Matthew ThomasMatthew Thomas, K Thompson
The equestrian industry reports high rates of serious injuries, illness and fatalities when compared to other high-risk sports and work environments. To address these ongoing safety concerns, a greater understanding of the relationship between human risk perception, values and safety behaviours is required. This paper presents results from an international survey that explored relationships between a respondents’ willingness to take risk during daily activities along with, their perceptions of risk and behaviours during horse-related interactions. Respondents’ comments around risk management principles and safety-first inspirations were also analysed. We examined what humans think about hazardous situations or activities and how they managed risk with suitable controls. Analysis identified three important findings. First, safe behaviours around horses were associated with safety training (formal and/or informal). Second, unsafe behaviours around horses were associated with higher levels of equestrian experience as well as income from horse-related work. Finally, findings revealed a general acceptance of danger and imminent injury during horse interactions. This may explain why some respondents de-emphasised or ‘talked-down’ the importance of safety-first principles. In this paper we predominantly reported quantitative findings of respondents self-reported safety behaviours, general and horse-related risk perceptions despite injury or illness. We discussed the benefits of improved safety-first principles like training, risk assessments, rider-horse match with enriched safety communications to enhance risk-mitigation during human–horse interactions. © 2020 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

History

Volume

10

Issue

12

Start Page

1

End Page

22

Number of Pages

22

eISSN

2076-2615

ISSN

2076-2615

Location

Switzerland

Publisher

MDPI

Publisher License

CC BY

Additional Rights

CC BY 4.0

Language

eng

Peer Reviewed

  • Yes

Open Access

  • Yes

Acceptance Date

2020-11-23

External Author Affiliations

University of South Australia

Author Research Institute

  • Appleton Institute

Era Eligible

  • Yes

Medium

Electronic

Journal

Animals

Article Number

2222

Usage metrics

    CQUniversity

    Licence

    Exports

    RefWorks
    BibTeX
    Ref. manager
    Endnote
    DataCite
    NLM
    DC