File(s) not publicly available

What do students really learn from interactive multimedia? : a physics case study

journal contribution
posted on 06.12.2017, 00:00 by S Yeo, R Loss, M Zadnik, D Treagust, Allan Harrison
Interactive multimedia is promoted as an effective and stimulating medium for learning science, but students do not always interact with multimedia as intended by the designers. We discuss students’ interactions with an interactive multimedia program segment about projectile motion in the context of long jumping. Qualitative data were collected using a video camera and split-screen recorder to record each student’s image, voice, and student–program interactions. Left to themselves, students’ interactions were superficial, but when asked to explain their observations of projectile motion illustrations, they were observed to retain common intuitive conceptions. Only following researcher intervention did students develop an awareness of abstract aspects of the program. These results suggest that, despite interactivity and animated graphics, interactive multimedia may not produce the desired outcome for students learning introductory physics concepts.

Funding

Category 1 - Australian Competitive Grants (this includes ARC, NHMRC)

History

Volume

72

Issue

10

Start Page

1351

End Page

1358

Number of Pages

8

ISSN

0002-9505

Location

Melville

Publisher

American Association of Physics Teachers

Language

en-aus

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

External Author Affiliations

Curtin University of Technology; Faculty of Arts, Health and Sciences; TBA Research Institute;

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

American journal of physics.

Exports

CQUniversity

Exports