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What aspects of shiftwork influence off-shift well-being of healthcare workers?

journal contribution
posted on 06.12.2017, 00:00 by J Barnes-Farrell, K Davies-Schrils, A McGonagle, B Walsh, Vitale Di MiliaVitale Di Milia, F Fischer, B Hobbs, L Kaliterna Lipovcan, D Tepas
Characteristics of shiftwork schedules have implications for off-shift well-being. We examined the extent to which several shift characteristics (e.g., shift length, working Sundays) are associated with three aspects of off-shift well-being: work-to-family conflict, physical well-being, and mental wellbeing. We also investigated whether these relationships differed in four nations. The Survey of Workand Time was completed by 906 healthcare professionals located in Australia, Brazil, Croatia, and the USA. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses supported the hypothesis that shiftwork characteristics account for significant unique variance in all three measures of well-being beyond that accounted for by work and family demands and personal characteristics. The patterns of regression weights indicated that particular shiftwork characteristics have differential relevance to indices of work- to-family conflict, physical well-being, and mental well-being. Our findings suggest that healthcare organizations should carefully consider the implications of shiftwork characteristics for off-shift well-being. Furthermore, although our findings did not indicate national differences in the nature of relationships between shift characteristics and well-being, shiftwork characteristics and demographics for healthcare professionals differ in systematic ways among nations; as such, effective solutions may be context-specific.

Funding

Category 1 - Australian Competitive Grants (this includes ARC, NHMRC)

History

Volume

39

Issue

5

Start Page

589

End Page

596

Number of Pages

8

ISSN

0003-6870

Location

United Kingdom

Publisher

Elsevier

Language

en-aus

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

External Author Affiliations

Faculty of Business and Informatics; Institut društvenih znanosti Ivo Pilar; South Dakota State University; Universidade de Sao Paulo; University of Connecticut;

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

Applied ergonomics : human factors in technology and society.

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