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Using online computer tailoring to promote physical activity: A randomized trial of text, video, and combined intervention delivery modes

journal contribution
posted on 06.12.2017, 00:00 by Katja SoetensKatja Soetens, Corneel VandelanotteCorneel Vandelanotte, H De Vries, WK Mummery
Website-delivered interventions are increasingly used to deliver physical activity interventions, yet problems with engagement and retention result in reduced effectiveness. Hence, alternative modes of online intervention delivery need to be explored. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the acceptability and effectiveness of a computer-tailored physical activity intervention delivered on the Internet in 3 delivery modes: video, text, or both. Australian adults (N¼803), recruited through e-mail, were randomized into the three delivery modes and received personal physical activity advice. Intervention content was identical across groups. Repeated measures analyses of variance were used to compare the three groups regarding acceptability, website usability, and physical activity. Participants in the video group accepted the content of the physical activity advice significantly better (F¼5.59; p<.01), and spent significantly more time on the website (F¼21.19; p<.001) compared with the text and combination groups. Total physical activity improved significantly over time in all groups (F¼3.95; p<.01). Although the combination group increased physical activity the most, few significant differences between groups were observed. Providing video-tailored feedback has advantages over the conventional text-tailored interventions; however, this study revealed few behavioral differences. More studies, examining alternative delivery modes, that can overcome the limitations of the present study, are needed.

Funding

Category 1 - Australian Competitive Grants (this includes ARC, NHMRC)

History

Volume

19

Issue

12

Start Page

1377

End Page

1392

Number of Pages

16

ISSN

1081-0730

Location

USA

Publisher

Taylor & Francis

Language

en-aus

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

External Author Affiliations

Institute for Health and Social Science Research (IHSSR); Maastricht University, Netherlands; TBA Research Institute; University of Alberta;

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

Journal of Health Communication