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Universities are not the safe places we would like to think they are, but they are getting safer' : Indigenous women academics in higher education

journal contribution
posted on 06.12.2017, 00:00 by Bronwyn Fredericks
This paper outlines some of the experiences of Indigenous women academics in higher education. The author offers these experiences, not to position Indigenous women academics as victims, but to expose the problematic nature of racism, systemic marginalisation, white race privilege and radicalised subjectivity played out within Australian higher education institutions. By utilising the experiences and examples she seeks to bring the theoretical into the everyday world of being Indigenous within academe. In analysing these examples, the author reveals the relationships between oppression, white race privilege, institutional privilege and the epistemology that maintains them. She argues that, in moving from a position of being silent to speaking about what she has witnessed and experienced, she is able to move from the position of object to subject and gain a form of liberated voice (hooks 1989: 9) for herself and other Indigenous women. She seeks to challenge the practices within universities that continue to subjugate Indigenous women academics.

History

Volume

14

Issue

1

Start Page

41

End Page

53

Number of Pages

13

ISSN

1440-5202

Language

en-aus

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

Cultural Warning

This research output may contain the names and images of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people now deceased. We apologize for any distress that may occur.

External Author Affiliations

Queensland University of Technology; TBA Research Institute;

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

Journal of Australian Indigenous Issues