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Unique associations of the Job Demand-Control-Support model subscales with leisure-time physical activity and dietary energy intake

Version 2 2022-11-02, 05:27
Version 1 2021-01-18, 13:58
journal contribution
posted on 2020-04-06, 00:00 authored by Christopher BeanChristopher Bean, HR Winefield, AD Hutchinson, Charli SargentCharli Sargent, Z Shi
Leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) and dietary energy intake are two important health behaviours, which at too low or high levels respectively, are associated with overweight and obesity. This study explores associations between subscales of the Job Demand-Control-Support (JDCS) model, LTPA and dietary energy intake. A cross-sectional design sampled current employees (N=433) from a South Australian cohort using a computer-assisted telephone interview and a self-completed food frequency questionnaire. In analyses adjusted for sex, age, and sociodemographic variables, higher levels of skill discretion were associated with increased odds for attaining sufficient physical activity (OR=2.45; 95% CI=1.10-5.47). Higher levels of decision authority were associated with reduced odds (OR=0.43; 95% CI=0.20-0.93) for being in the highest tertile of daily energy intake. Higher scores for coworker support were associated with increased odds (OR=2.20; 95% CI=1.15-4.23) for being in the highest tertile of daily energy intake. These findings support the consideration of the individual JDCS subscales, since this practice may reveal novel associations with health behaviour outcomes, thereby presenting new opportunities to improve employee health and wellbeing.

History

Volume

57

Issue

1

Start Page

99

End Page

117

Number of Pages

19

eISSN

1880-8026

ISSN

0019-8366

Publisher

National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health, Japan

Additional Rights

CC BY-NC-ND 4.0

Peer Reviewed

  • Yes

Open Access

  • Yes

Acceptance Date

2018-06-29

External Author Affiliations

Uppsala University, SwedenUniversity of Adelaide; University of South Australia; Qatar University, Qatar

Author Research Institute

  • Appleton Institute

Era Eligible

  • Yes

Journal

Industrial health

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