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Translocation and dissemination of commensal bacteria in post-stroke infection

journal contribution
posted on 31.08.2018, 00:00 authored by Dragana StanleyDragana Stanley, LJ Mason, KE Mackin, YN Srikhanta, D Lyras, MD Prakash, K Nurgali, A Venegas, MD Hill, RJ Moore
Bacterial infection is highly prevalent in patients who have had a stroke. Despite the potential contribution of micro-aspiration in post-stroke pneumonia, we found that the majority of the microorganisms detected in the patients who developed infections after having a stroke were common commensal bacteria that normally reside in the intestinal tracts. In a mouse model of ischemic stroke, post-stroke infection was only observed in mice that were born and raised in specific-pathogen-free facilities; this was not seen in mice that were born and raised in germ-free facilities. Using high-throughput 16S rRNA gene amplicon sequencing and bioinformatics analyses, we provide evidence demonstrating that the source of the bacteria forming the microbial community in the lungs of post-stroke mice was indeed the host small intestine. Additionally, stroke-induced gut barrier permeability and dysfunction preceded the dissemination of orally inoculated bacteria to peripheral tissues. This study identifies a novel pathway in which stroke promotes the translocation and dissemination of selective strains of bacteria that originated from the host gut microbiota.

Funding

Category 1 - Australian Competitive Grants (this includes ARC, NHMRC)

History

Volume

22

Issue

11

Start Page

1277

End Page

1284

Number of Pages

8

eISSN

1546-170X

ISSN

1078-8956

Location

United States

Publisher

Nature Publishing Group

Language

eng

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

External Author Affiliations

Monash University; Victoria University; University of Calgary, Canada;

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

Nature Medicine