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Top priorities for health service improvements among Australian oncology patients

journal contribution
posted on 27.07.2021, 01:58 by Alix Hall, Jamie Bryant, Robert Sanson-Fisher, Alice Grady, Anthony Proietto, Christopher DoranChristopher Doran
Objective: To determine among a sample of Australian cancer patients receiving outpatient oncology care: 1) the most frequently endorsed general health service improvements selected by patients; 2) for the three most endorsed general health service improvements, the proportion of participants endorsing specific health service changes; and 3) sociodemographic, disease and treatment characteristics associated with the most frequently endorsed general health service improvements. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted across six outpatient oncology treatment units located in New South Wales, Australia. Patients receiving chemotherapy for any cancer diagnosis at any of six oncology services were recruited. Participants completed an online survey which included the Consumer Preferences Survey. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify sociodemographic, disease and treatment characteristics associated with frequently endorsed health service improvements. Results: A total of 879 eligible patients initiated the survey (72% consent rate). Participants selected a median of two health service improvements. The three most wanted improvements were car parking (56%), up-to-date information about treatment or condition progress (19%), and hospital catering (17%). Age was the only characteristic significantly associated with identifying car parking as a needed improvement. Conclusion: Achieving high quality cancer care requires understanding of the views and experiences of patients about the quality of care they receive. Car parking and access to information were the two most frequently endorsed general health service changes desired by this sample of participants. Practice Implication: Future studies could examine whether enacting changes as per patient feedback improves patient perceptions of quality of care, and health outcomes.

Funding

Category 3 - Industry and Other Research Income

History

Volume

12

Start Page

83

End Page

95

Number of Pages

13

eISSN

1179-271X

ISSN

1179-271X

Location

New Zealand

Publisher

Dove Medical Press

Publisher License

CC BY-NC

Additional Rights

CC BY-NC 3.0

Language

eng

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

Yes

Acceptance Date

31/03/2021

External Author Affiliations

University of Newcastle

Author Research Institute

Centre for Indigenous Health Equity Research

Era Eligible

Yes

Medium

Electronic-eCollection

Journal

Patient Related Outcome Measures