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The relationship between multiple levels of learning practices and objective and subjective organizational financial performance

journal contribution
posted on 06.12.2017, 00:00 by Vitale Di Milia, K Birdi
Multi-level learning approaches suggest that individuals, groups and organizations act both independently and interact dynamically to contribute to organizational performance. We directly examined this proposition in an Australian sample using a longitudinal design that employed subjective and objective financial performance data. Respondents completed a survey that provided details on their individual, team and organizational learning practices ILP, TLP and OLP, respectively), and self assessed performance compared to 3 years ago. Concurrently, we collected objective performance data (sales/employee numbers) at 3 yearly intervals and averaged these data to create an index. Using hierarchical and moderated regression, we found a positive main effect for OLP with both subjective and objective performance. Main effects for ILP and TLP were not found. Further, we found a significant interaction between ILP and TLP such that the effect of TLP on productivity was better in organizations with less ILP. Three-way interactions were not found. Overall, these results provide some support for the model. We discuss some limitations of the study and make recommendations for future studies.

History

Volume

31

Start Page

481

End Page

498

Number of Pages

18

ISSN

0894-3796

Location

New York

Publisher

Wiley-Blackwell

Language

en-aus

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

External Author Affiliations

Faculty of Arts, Business, Informatics and Education; Institute for Health and Social Science Research (IHSSR); University of Connecticut; University of Sheffield;

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

Journal of organizational behavior.

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