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The relationship between facial affect recognition and cognitive functioning after traumatic brain injury

journal contribution
posted on 05.02.2019, 00:00 by J Yim, DR Babbage, Barbra ZupanBarbra Zupan, D Neumann, B Willer
Primary objective: There is considerable evidence suggesting facial affect recognition and cognitive functions are impaired in many people with moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, little is known about the relationship between these two domains in the TBI population. Research design: This study investigated the relationship between facial affect recognition and cognitive functioning in 75 adults with moderate-to-severe TBI. Methods and procedures: Participants were administered three facial affect recognition tests and a computerized cognitive test battery that assessed seven cognitive domains. Main outcomes and results: Deficits in facial affect recognition were significantly correlated with impairments in non-verbal memory, working memory, speed of processing, verbal memory and verbal delayed memory. No significant relationship was found between executive dysfunction and facial affect recognition impairments. Non-verbal memory, working memory and speed of processing significantly predicted overall facial affect recognition performance. Conclusions: It is concluded that impairment in several cognitive processes may contribute to facial affect recognition deficits in TBI, in particular non-verbal memory, working memory and speed of processing. Furthermore, executive functioning may not be a critical factor in facial affect recognition, but would most likely be important in deciding what to do once facial affect is perceived. © 2013 Informa UK Ltd. All rights reserved: reproduction in whole or part not permitted.

Funding

Other

History

Volume

27

Issue

10

Start Page

1155

End Page

1161

Number of Pages

7

eISSN

1362-301X

ISSN

0269-9052

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

External Author Affiliations

State University of New York; Indiana University School of Medicine; Massey University, Auckland University of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

Brain Injury