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The provision of emergency healthcare for women who experience intimate partner violence: Part 2: Strategies to address knowledge deficits and negative attitudes

journal contribution
posted on 22.09.2020, 00:00 by Shannon Bakon, Annabel TaylorAnnabel Taylor, Silke MeyerSilke Meyer
Background The first article in this two-part series evaluated healthcare professionals’ approaches to the care of women who present to the emergency department (ED) with injuries related to intimate partner violence (IPV). It identified barriers to appropriate care provision, which included a lack of healthcare professional knowledge and negative professional attitudes. Aim To delineate and evaluate strategies that aim to address the knowledge deficits and negative attitudes affecting the care of women presenting to the ED with IPV-related injuries. Method A rapid review of three databases was undertaken with strict inclusion and exclusion criteria. The literature was analysed using three-step thematic analysis. Findings Eleven articles were included in the review. Two main strategies to address ED healthcare professionals’ knowledge deficits and negative attitudes about IPV were identified. These were developed into the themes of IPV/domestic violence specialists, and education and training. Conclusion An IPV healthcare specialist in the ED and a focused IPV education and training programme may improve emergency healthcare professionals’ knowledge, attitudes and ability to respond appropriately to women presenting with IPV-related injuries.

History

Volume

28

Issue

4

Start Page

18

End Page

23

Number of Pages

6

eISSN

2047-8984

ISSN

1354-5752

Publisher

RCN Publishing

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

Acceptance Date

16/01/2020

External Author Affiliations

Queensland Health; Monash University

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

Emergency Nurse