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The prevalence and cross-sectional associations of neuropathic-like pain among older, community-dwelling women with arthritis.

journal contribution
posted on 20.07.2018, 00:00 by KE de Luca, Lynne ParkinsonLynne Parkinson, JE Byles, TKT Lo, HP Pollard, FM Blyth
OBJECTIVE: To estimate the prevalence and examine the associations of neuropathic-like pain in a community-based sample of older Australian women with arthritis. DESIGN: Population based cross-sectional survey. SETTING: Participants were recruited from the 1946-1951 cohort of the Australian Longitudinal Study of Women's Health. SUBJECTS: . Women with self-reported arthritis (n = 147). METHODS: . Primary outcome measure was self-reported neuropathic-like pain, defined as scores ≥12 via the painDETECT screening tool. Descriptive statistics summarized health and socio-demographic characteristics, and comparisons made using student's t-test or Wilcoxon Rank Sum test, and Chi-square tests. Independent health and demographic variables were examined by univariable logistic regression, and significant variables included in multiple variable logistic regression modelling. RESULTS: Thirty-nine women (26.5%) were screened as having neuropathic-like pain. Women with neuropathic-like pain were more likely to have poorer health, worse pain, higher pain catastrophizing, more fatigue, and more depression than women with nociceptive pain. Neuropathic-like pain was significantly associated with higher scores on the SF-MPQ sensory scale and pain catastrophizing scale, and with more medication use. CONCLUSIONS: . Neuropathic-like pain in women with arthritis was common and is associated with greater disability and poorer quality of life.

Funding

Category 3 - Industry and Other Research Income

History

Volume

17

Issue

7

Start Page

1308

End Page

1316

Number of Pages

9

eISSN

1526-4637

ISSN

1526-2375

Location

England

Publisher

Blackwell Publishing, UK

Additional Rights

Free access to this article is provided by the publisher, Oxford University Press.

Language

eng

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

Yes

External Author Affiliations

University of Newcastle; University of Notre Dame Sydney Australia; Concord Clinical School, University of Sydney, Australia

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

Pain Medicine

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