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The poor 'r' us

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journal contribution
posted on 06.12.2017, 00:00 authored by Jonathan SibleyJonathan Sibley
In the past 30 years, writers such as Nobel prize-winning economist Amartya Sen and Martha Nussbaum have forced us to broaden our understanding of poverty beyond the idea of a lack of money. We no longer measure poverty merely in terms of income per capita; we now measure education, life expectancy, human rights and focus on well-being. We have expanded our development interventions from programmes focussed solely on increasing income, to a range of interventions focussed on capability and ‘functionings’ (defined by Sen as the various things a person may value doing or being). Yet, our discourse remains overwhelmingly biased toward money as the key between capability and well-being. Even Sen’s model continues to centre on money. He sees inadequate capability as often being evidenced by an economically driven absence of choice. In persisting with this approach, capability is not only linked to money, but is directly linked to the perceived primary outcome of exercising economic choice: well-being.

Funding

Category 1 - Australian Competitive Grants (this includes ARC, NHMRC)

History

Volume

15

Start Page

14

ISSN

1176-8185

Location

Wellington, NZ

Publisher

Dev-Zone

Language

en-aus

Peer Reviewed

No

Open Access

No

External Author Affiliations

Learning and Teaching Education Research Centre (LTERC); Melbourne International Campus;

Era Eligible

No

Journal

Just change: critical thinking on global change.

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