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The laboratory diagnosis of Strongyloides stercoralis

journal contribution
posted on 21.02.2018, 00:00 by MR Watts, G Robertson, Richard Bradbury
It is estimated that over 30 million people worldwide are infected by the nematode, Strongyloides stercoralis1. It is endemic in sub-tropical and tropical parts of Australia, with high rates of infection documented in some indigenous communities2. Due to the potential for chronic autoinfection, that may persist for decades, migration leads to the presence of the infection in non-endemic areas1. Transmission tohumansis generallythrough the penetration of larvae through the skin, following contact with faecally contaminated soil1. Disease severity ranges from asymptomatic chronic carriage to an overwhelming illness, where large numbers spread throughout the body, usually triggered by immunosuppression1.

History

Volume

37

Issue

1

Start Page

4

End Page

9

Number of Pages

6

eISSN

2201-9189

ISSN

1324-4272

Publisher

CSIRO Publishing

Additional Rights

Published four times a year in print and open access online by CSIRO - Journal issue

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

Yes

Cultural Warning

This research output may contain the names and images of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people now deceased. We apologize for any distress that may occur.

External Author Affiliations

University of Sydney, Westmead Hospital; James Cook University

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

Microbiology Australia

Exports

CQUniversity

Exports