File(s) not publicly available

The impact of exposure to wagering advertisements and inducements on intended and actual betting expenditure: An ecological momentary assessment study

journal contribution
posted on 29.08.2019, 00:00 authored by Matthew BrowneMatthew Browne, Nerilee HingNerilee Hing, Alexander RussellAlexander Russell, A Thomas, R Jenkinson
Background and aims: Research suggests that a large proportion of regular sports and race bettors experience harm related to their gambling. In Australia, people who bet regularly are targeted by a proliferation of different forms of inducements and advertising – many of which are believed to encourage excessive betting and erroneous perceptions of risk. However, scant research has examined the impact of marketing messaging to this group, which is also limited to cross-sectional or qualitative designs. We aimed to determine whether exposure to wagering advertisements and inducements influenced intended betting expenditure, actual betting expenditure, and spending more than intended. Methods: We report on an ecological momentary assessment study, measuring regular exposure to 20 different forms of marketing, as well as wagering spend from 318 race bettors and 279 sports bettors. Up to 15 assessments per participant were conducted over 3 weeks (mean = 11.46, median = 14), yielding 6,843 observations for analysis. Results: Exposure to advertising and inducements was reliably linked to a greater likelihood of betting, higher intended and actual betting expenditure, and spending more than intended. “Push” messaging and inducements that convey the impression of reduced risk (stake-back inducements and multibet offers) were particularly influential, as well as brands promoted during events and advertisements on betting websites/apps. Discussion and conclusions: Given that a large proportion of regular sports and race bettors experience problems, restrictions on these forms of marketing are advisable. These findings suggest that this is particularly important for marketing that is “pushed” to gamblers or that suggests reduced risk. © 2019 The Author(s)

Funding

Category 2 - Other Public Sector Grants Category

History

Volume

8

Issue

1

Start Page

146

End Page

156

Number of Pages

11

eISSN

2063-5303

ISSN

2062-5871

Publisher

Akademiai Kiado, Hungary

Additional Rights

CC BY-NC 4.0

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

Yes

Acceptance Date

24/02/2019

External Author Affiliations

RMIT; 3 Australian Gambling Research Centre; Monash University

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

Journal of Behavioral Addictions