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The evidence that cyclic alternating pattern subtypes affect cognitive functioning is very weak

journal contribution
posted on 06.12.2017, 00:00 by Gregory Roach, D Navarro, Charli Sargent
In their recent paper, Ferri et al. [1] examined the relationships between cognitive functioning and three subtypes of the cyclic alternating pattern (CAP) in non-REM sleep. They concluded that ‘‘CAP A1 subtypes are associated with higher [i.e., better] cognitive functioning, whereas CAP A3 subtypes are associated with lower [i.e., poorer] cognitive functioning” (p. 378). For the reasons summarised below, we contend that In their recent paper, Ferri et al. [1] examined the relationships between cognitive functioning and three subtypes of the cyclic alternating pattern (CAP) in non-REM sleep. They concluded that ‘‘CAP A1 subtypes are associated with higher [i.e., better] cognitive functioning, whereas CAP A3 subtypes are associated with lower [i.e., poorer] cognitive functioning” (p. 378). For the reasons summarised below, we contend that this conclusion is not warranted based on the data presented.

Funding

Category 1 - Australian Competitive Grants (this includes ARC, NHMRC)

History

Volume

118

Start Page

803

End Page

803

Number of Pages

1

ISSN

1389-9457

Location

Netherlands

Publisher

Elsevier

Language

en-aus

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

External Author Affiliations

Centre for Sleep Research;

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

Sleep medicine.

Exports