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The effect of total sleep deprivation on cognitive performance during night-shift for early and late chronotypes

journal contribution
posted on 02.12.2020, 00:00 authored by Andrew ReiterAndrew Reiter, Charli SargentCharli Sargent, Gregory RoachGregory Roach
A single night of total sleep deprivation (TSD) impairs cognitive performance. Many shift workers struggle to transition to nightshift and have been awake for at least 24 hours by the end of their first night-shift. Evidence suggests chronotype, an individual difference which reflects circadian phase, also affects cognitive performance during nightshift. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of chronotype on the effect of TSD on cognitive performance during night-shift. As early types are suggested to experience greater circadian misalignment during nightshift than late types, early types were predicted to perform worse than late types over the night-shift. However early types were predicted to outperform late types towards the end of the night-shift, due to increased alertness associated with their advanced circadian phase.

Funding

Category 1 - Australian Competitive Grants (this includes ARC, NHMRC)

History

Volume

64

Issue

S1

Start Page

S317

End Page

S318

eISSN

1878-5506

ISSN

1389-9457

Publisher

Elsevier BV

Language

en

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

Author Research Institute

Appleton Institute

Era Eligible

No

Journal

Sleep Medicine