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The effect of lipophilicity and dose on the frequency of statin-associated muscle symptoms: A systematic review and meta-analysis

journal contribution
posted on 20.06.2018, 00:00 by Jordon Irwin, Saman Khalesi, Andrew Fenning, Rebecca Vella
Addressing the factors which lead to the development of statin-associated muscle symptoms (SAMS) is vital for maintaining patient compliance with these pharmaceuticals, and thus improving patient outcomes. This study aimed to clarify the relationship between statin lipophilicity, or dose, and the frequency of adverse muscle symptoms using a systematic review of randomised controlled trials (RCTs). RCTs, including statin monotherapy and placebo groups, which reported data on muscle adverse events were identified through the PubMed and Scopus databases. Risk ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were pooled using a random-effects meta-analysis. A total of 135 RCTs were included in this review. Statin therapy was associated with a significant, but modest, increase in the risk of adverse muscle symptoms compared to placebo (RR = 1.050; 95% CI = 1.014–1.089; P = 0.007; I 2 = 3.291%). This significant association was primarily due to the inclusion of RCTs recruiting participants with a history of statin intolerance. Lipophilic statins had no appreciable impact on the development of SAMS compared to hydrophilic formulations. A univariate meta-regression of dose (sta ndardised to atorvastatin dose equivalents) and the risk of musculoskeletal complaints also showed no significant association. The results obtained from this meta-analysis indicate that there is a slight increase in the risk of SAMS, especially in individuals with a history of statin intolerance. There is limited evidence to suggest that the risk of SAMS would differ between the use of lipophilic and hydrophilic statins, or high- and low-dose therapy. © 2017 Elsevier Ltd

History

Volume

128

Start Page

264

End Page

273

Number of Pages

10

eISSN

1096-1186

ISSN

1043-6618

Publisher

Academic Press, UK

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

Acceptance Date

20/09/2017

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

Pharmacological Research

Exports