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The distinctiveness of the word-length effect

journal contribution
posted on 06.12.2017, 00:00 by C Hulme, I Neath, George Stuart, L Shostak, A Surprenant, G Brown
The authors report 2 experiments that compare the serial recall of pure lists of long words, pure lists of short words, and lists of long or short words containing just a single isolated word of a different length. In both experiments for pure lists, there was a substantial recall advantage for short words; the isolated words were recalled better than other words in the same list, and there was a reverse word-length effect: Isolated long words were recalled better than isolated short words. These results contradict models that seek to explain the word-length effect in terms of list-based accounts of rehearsal speed or in terms of item-based effects (such as difficulty of assembling items).

Funding

Category 1 - Australian Competitive Grants (this includes ARC, NHMRC)

History

Volume

32

Issue

3

Start Page

586

End Page

594

Number of Pages

9

ISSN

0278-7393

Location

Washington

Publisher

American Psychological Association

Language

en-aus

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

External Author Affiliations

Goldsmiths' College; Not affiliated to a Research Institute; Purdue University; University of Warwick; University of York;

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

Journal of experimental psychology : learning, memory, and cognition.