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The development of habitat selection by subadult koalas

journal contribution
posted on 06.12.2017, 00:00 by Gail TuckerGail Tucker, Alistair MelzerAlistair Melzer, William EllisWilliam Ellis
Dispersal by subadults is the principal source of gene flow between groups of koalas in Queensland, so understanding the behaviour of these immature animals is a priority for understanding the ecology of the species. Recent reports postulate that dispersing young koalas may inherit maternal tree selection, but avoid competing with adults. We compared the tree use and diet of adult female koalas with that of their offspring on St Bees Island, Queensland, using radio-tracking and faecal cuticle analysis, to examine this prediction. Koalas at St Bees Island used both fodder and non-fodder species during daytime, moving into fodder species at night. Koala diets were dominated by Eucalyptus tereticornis with E. platyphylla and Corymbia intermedia also represented. Utilisation of daytime tree species was diverse, but at night koalas were found almost exclusively in those species present in their diet. Use of trees during daytime by natal young and young adult koalas were similar to that of maternal adults, but tree use by intermediate stages (independent and dispersing young) during daytime varied from that of the mothers. This resource separation indicates that if tree utilisation for resting is learned from the mother, young animals are excluded from preferred trees while dispersing.

History

Volume

55

Issue

5

Start Page

285

End Page

289

Number of Pages

5

ISSN

0004-959X

Location

Australia

Publisher

C S I R O Publishing

Language

en-aus

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

External Author Affiliations

Koala Research Centre of Central Queensland;

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

Australian journal of zoology.

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