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The association between time-use behaviors and physical and mental well-being in adults: A compositional isotemporal substitution analysis

journal contribution
posted on 18.02.2020, 00:00 by RG Curtis, D Dumuid, T Olds, R Plotnikoff, Corneel VandelanotteCorneel Vandelanotte, J Ryan, S Edney, C Maher
Background: Substantial evidence links activity domains with health and well-being; however, research has typically examined time-use behaviors independently, rather than considering daily activity as a 24-hour time-use composition. This study used compositional data analysis to estimate the difference in physical and mental well-being associated with reallocating time between behaviors. Methods: Participants (n = 430; 74% female; 41 [12] y) wore an accelerometer for 7 days and reported their body mass index; health-related quality of life (QoL); and symptoms of depression, anxiety, and stress. Regression models determined whether time-use composition, comprising sleep, sedentary behavior, light physical activity (LPA), and moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA), was associated with well-being. Compositional isotemporal substitution models estimated the difference in well-being associated with reallocating time between behaviors. Results: Time-use composition was associated with body mass index and physical health-related QoL. Reallocating time to MVPA from sleep, sedentary behavior, and LPA showed favorable associations with body mass index and physical health-related QoL, whereas reallocations from MVPA to other behaviors showed unfavorable associations. Reallocations from LPA to sedentary behavior were associated with better physical health–related QoL and vice versa. Conclusion: Results reinforce the importance of MVPA for physical health but do not suggest that replacing sedentary behavior with LPA is beneficial for health and well-being.

Funding

Category 1 - Australian Competitive Grants (this includes ARC, NHMRC)

History

Volume

17

Issue

2

Start Page

197

End Page

203

Number of Pages

7

eISSN

1543-5474

ISSN

1543-3080

Publisher

Human Kinetics, USA

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

External Author Affiliations

University of South Australia; The University of Newcastle

Author Research Institute

Appleton Institute

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

Journal of Physical Activity and Health

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