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That psychological bulls**t: Surprising findings from community research are improving psychological preparedness information

journal contribution
posted on 04.06.2019, 00:00 by Danielle Every, Amy Reynolds, H Keen-Dyer, M Dyer, P Miller-Rose, Joshua Trigg
Effective preparedness is often communicated as physical actions such as having a survival plan and an emergency kit or reinforcing, moving and clearing property. However, the physiological responses to an overwhelming threat can disrupt the best-laid preparations and plans. Psychological and emotional preparedness during the response phase of a disaster helps identify and manage fear to reduce the impacts on cognitive and behavioural functioning. Rates of psychological and emotional preparedness are generally lower than for physical preparedness. This presents particular challenges when communicating this type of risk. This paper reports on qualitative research with residents and agencies in south-east Queensland about what psychological and emotional preparedness means to them, what prevents people from engaging with this type of risk and how best to communicate it.

Funding

Other

History

Volume

33

Issue

4

Start Page

57

End Page

61

Number of Pages

5

Start Date

01/09/2018

Finish Date

05/09/2018

eISSN

2204-2288

ISSN

1324-1540

Location

Brisbane

Publisher

Emergency Management Australia

Place of Publication

Brisbane, Aus

Additional Rights

OA

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

Yes

Acceptance Date

22/08/2018

External Author Affiliations

Bundaberg Regional Council; Queensland Fire and Emergency Services

Author Research Institute

Appleton Institute

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

The Australian Journal of Emergency Management

Exports