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Teaching in fractured classrooms : refugee education, public culture, community and ethics

journal contribution
posted on 06.12.2017, 00:00 by R Hattam, Danielle Every
During the last decade or so, schooling policy has had to increasingly grapple with processes that have a global reach. One significant aspect of globalisation has been the global flows of asylum seekers and refugees. Although Australia has a long history of accepting asylum seekers and refugees, in recent times, concerns about national security have fuelled community disquiet about refugees and asylum seekers. As such the ‘refugee problem’ is a crucial site for research by those interested in the relationships between a vibrant and socially just society and educational policy and practice. This paper draws on Rose’s genealogy of ‘community’ (that is community now a site for governmentality); and Bauman’s meditation on ‘elusive community’ (how can we have both freedom and security?) as a means to think through an appropriate ethico-politics for educators grappling with the refugee problem in Australia.

Funding

Category 1 - Australian Competitive Grants (this includes ARC, NHMRC)

History

Volume

13

Issue

4

Start Page

409

End Page

424

Number of Pages

16

eISSN

1470-109X

ISSN

1361-3324

Location

United Kingdom

Publisher

Routledge

Language

en-aus

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

External Author Affiliations

TBA Research Institute; University of South Australia;

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

Race ethnicity and education.

Exports

CQUniversity

Exports