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Strongyloidiasis does not discriminate: Nor should the screening and treatment

journal contribution
posted on 13.05.2022, 00:28 authored by Meruyert Cooper-Beknazarova, Mae White, Harriet Whiley, Darren J Gray, Polydor N Mutombo, Richard Bradbury, Don McManus, Catherine Gordon, Jennifer JuddJennifer Judd, Kirstin E Ross
Strongyloidiasis is caused by the soil-transmitted helminth, Strongyloides stercoralis. It has been estimated to infect between 380 and 613 million people worldwide1, 2 and remains endemic in remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities in Australia.3-12 Despite strongyloidiasis being a chronic health issue and seroprevalence reaching 60% in some communities,13 the true incidence remains unknown as a result of underdiagnosis and absence of surveillance data across Australia.13 In their study, Hansen et al.14 found that strongyloidiasis seropositivity is not associated with symptoms and therefore argued that S. stercoralis seropositive cases should not become notifiable. We do not support Hansen et al.'s14 conclusions.

History

Volume

51

Issue

12

Start Page

2160

End Page

2161

Number of Pages

2

eISSN

1445-5994

ISSN

1444-0903

Publisher

Wiley

Language

en

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

Cultural Warning

This research output may contain the names and images of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people now deceased. We apologize for any distress that may occur.

Acceptance Date

22/12/2020

Era Eligible

No

Medium

Print

Journal

Internal Medicine Journal