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Strength training improves submaximum cardiovascular performance in older men

journal contribution
posted on 06.12.2017, 00:00 by D Lovell, R Cuneo, Gregory GassGregory Gass
Purpose: To determine if 16 weeks of strength training canimprove the cardiovascular function of older men during submaximum aerobic exercise. Methods: Twenty four men aged 70-80 yr were randomly assigned to a strength training (ST; n = 12) and control group (C; n = 12). Training consisted of 3 sets of 6 - 10 repetitions at 70% to 90% of 1RM, 3 times per week, on an incline squat machine for 16 weeks, followed by 4 weeks detraining. Leg strength and maximum oxygen consumption (VO2 max) were assessed every 4 weeks of the 20-week study. Cardiovascular function was assessed during submaximum cycle exercise at 40 Watts, 50% and 70% of VO₂ max before training, after 16 weeks training, and after 4 weeks detraining. Results: At 40 Watts, heart rate (HR), systolic blood pressure, and rate pressure product (RPP) were lower and stroke volume (SV) significantly higher after 16 weeks training and 4 weeks detraining: at 50% VO₂ max, HR and RPP were lower after 16 weeks training and 4 weeks detraining: at 70% VO₂ max, cycle ergometry power, VO₂ and arterio-venous oxygen difference ( a - v O₂) were higher after 16 weeks training. Leg strength and VO₂ max increased after 16 weeks training, with leg strength remaining above pre-training levels after 4-weeks detraining. Conclusions: Sixteen weeks of strength training significantly improves the cardiovascular function of older men. Therefore strength training not only increases muscular strength and hypertrophy but also provides significant cardiovascular benefits for older individuals.

History

Volume

32

Issue

3

Start Page

117

End Page

124

Number of Pages

8

eISSN

2152-0895

ISSN

1539-8412

Location

United States

Publisher

Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

Language

en-aus

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

External Author Affiliations

Bond University (Gold Coast, Qld.); Princess Alexandra Hospital (Brisbane, Qld.); TBA Research Institute; University of the Sunshine Coast;

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

Journal of geriatric physical therapy.