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Staff perceptions of best practice for information transfer about multitrauma patients on discharge from the emergency department: a focus group study

journal contribution
posted on 10.05.2021, 00:20 by Pauline Calleja, L Aitken, M Cooke
Aims and Objectives: To understand: (1) staff perceptions of best practice for information transfer for multitrauma patients on discharge from the emergency department; (2) what information should be conveyed at transfer and (3) how information is transferred. Background: Information transfer for multitrauma patients is an integral factor for continuity of care, safety, quality assurance and patient outcomes; however, this has not been the focus of previous studies. Design: This was a qualitative study using focus group interviews. Methods: Data were collected during focus group interviews across five clinical areas. Themes were derived from the data with consensus from three data coders. Purposive sampling was used and included staff caring for trauma patients during patient transition out of the emergency department. Participants were representatives of the emergency department, perioperative care, intensive care unit, high dependency care unit and the trauma service unit. Twenty-six registered nurses and two medical officers participated. Results: Five focus group interviews were held. Themes emerged from the data including ‘Variability’, ‘Continuity’ and ‘Putting the pieces together’. The first three themes were all influenced by the fourth theme of ‘Values/Context’. Considered together these themes influenced staff perception of the quality of information transfer for multitrauma patients on discharge from the emergency department. Conclusions: Staff perceived best practice for information transfer to be clear, concise, relevant documentation that travelled with the patient and interactive communication at handover that adhered to agreed principles and a minimum data set specific to trauma patients. Relevance to clinical practice: Clinicians involved in handover need to actively listen, avoiding ‘doing’ at the same time, be aware of essential questions to ask about the patient. An agreed expectation between different clinical areas needs to exist about information transfer to reduce variability. The minimum data required to provide ongoing safe care for multitrauma patients are identified. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd

History

Volume

25

Issue

19-20

Start Page

2863

End Page

2873

eISSN

1365-2702

ISSN

0962-1067

Location

England

Publisher

Wiley

Language

eng

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

Acceptance Date

26/03/2016

External Author Affiliations

Griffith University

Era Eligible

Yes

Medium

Print-Electronic

Journal

Journal of Clinical Nursing