File(s) not publicly available

Soil compaction in tropical organic farming systems and its impact on natural soil-borne disease suppression : challenges for management

journal contribution
posted on 06.12.2017, 00:00 authored by L Ishak, Melinda MchenryMelinda Mchenry, Philip BrownPhilip Brown
Organic farming systems still depend on intensive, mechanical soil tillage. Frequent passes by machinery traffic cause substantial soil compaction that threatens soil health. Adopting practices as reduced tillage and organic matter retention on the soil surface are considered effective ways to control soil compaction. In tropical regions, however, the acceleration of soil organic matter decomposition and soil carbon turnover on the topsoil layer is influenced more rapidly by the oscillation process of drying and wetting. It is hypothesized therefore, that rapid reduction in soil organic matter hastens the potential for compaction to occur in organic farming systems. Compaction changes soil physical properties and as a consequence it has been implicated as a causal agent in the inhibition of natural disease suppression in soils. Here we describe relationships between soil management in organic vegetable systems, soil compaction, and declining soil capacity to suppress pathogenic microorganisms.

Funding

Category 1 - Australian Competitive Grants (this includes ARC, NHMRC)

History

Volume

7

Issue

11

Start Page

776

End Page

778

Number of Pages

3

eISSN

2010-3778

ISSN

2010-376X

Location

United States

Publisher

World Academy of Science, Engineering and Technology

Language

en-aus

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

External Author Affiliations

School of Medical and Applied Sciences (2013- ); TBA Research Institute;

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

International journal of social, human science and engineering.