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Socio-demographic, ecological factors and dengue infection trends in Australia

journal contribution
posted on 12.07.2018, 00:00 authored by R Akter, Suchithra NaishSuchithra Naish, W Hu, S Tong
Dengue cases, socio-demographic, climatic and land use types for the period January 1999 to December 2010 were collected from Australian National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System, Australian Bureau of Statistics, Australian Bureau of Meteorology, and Australian Bureau of Dengue has been a major public health concern in Australia. This study has explored the spatio-temporal trends of dengue and potential socio- demographic and ecological determinants in Australia. Data on dAgricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences, respectively. Descriptive and linear regression analyses were performed to observe the spa-tio-temporal trends of dengue, socio-demographic and ecological factors in Australia. A total of 5,853 dengue cases (both local and overseas acquired) were recorded across Australia between January 1999 and December 2010. Most the cases (53.0%) were reported from Queensland, followed by New South Wales (16.5%). Dengue outbreak was highest (54.2%) during 2008–2010. A highest percentage of overseas arrivals (29.9%), households having rainwater tanks (33.9%), Indigenous population (27.2%), separate houses (26.5%), terrace house types (26.9%) and economically advantage people (42.8%) were also observed during 2008–2010. Regression analyses demonstrate that there was an increasing trend of dengue incidence, potential socio-ecological factors such as overseas arrivals, number of households having rainwater tanks, housing types and land use types (e.g. intensive uses and production from dryland agriculture). Spatial variation of socio-demographic factors was also observed in this study. In near future, significant increase of temperature was also projected across Australia. The projected increased temperature as well as increased socio-ecological trend may pose a future threat to the local transmission of dengue in other parts of Australia if Aedes mosquitoes are being established. Therefore, upgraded mosquito and disease surveillance at different ports should be in place to reduce the chance of mosquitoes and dengue cases being imported into all over Australia. © 2017 Akter et al.

Funding

Category 1 - Australian Competitive Grants (this includes ARC, NHMRC)

History

Volume

12

Issue

10

Start Page

1

End Page

18

Number of Pages

18

eISSN

1932-6203

Publisher

Public Library of Science, USA

Additional Rights

CC BY 4.0

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

Yes

Acceptance Date

14/09/2017

External Author Affiliations

Queensland University of Technology; Anhui Medical University, Shanghai Children’s Medical Centre, China

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

PLoS ONE

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