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Social workers' beliefs about the interventions for schizophrenia and depression : a comparison with the public and other health professionals - an Australian analysis

journal contribution
posted on 06.12.2017, 00:00 by P Cesare, R King
The objective of the research was to investigate social workers' beliefs about the value of interventions for schizophrenia and depression; to determine their capacity to detect the mental health problem described in the vignette; and to compare the results of social workers with the general public and other health professionals. A total of 1,277 questionnaires were distributed to social workers which were previously used to examine the beliefs of psychiatrists, general practitioners, mental health nurses, clinical psychologists and the general public. There was a 30.3 per cent (n = 387) response rate. Participants responded to a vignette describing a person with either depression or schizophrenia and rated a range of interventions as helpful, harmful or neither. The majority of respondents identified depression (90 per cent, n = 166) but only 59 per cent (n = 120) recognised schizophrenia. The research demonstrates that social workers support a broad range of interventions and endorsed the lifestyle interventions more than any of the other professionals. However, the research also suggests that social workers may have difficulties in both accurate awareness of mental health problems and in knowledge of current treatment practices. It is important that social workers receive adequate mental health education in their undergraduate degrees, to aid in the recognition and treatment of mental illness, so that people suffering from mental illness receive optimum care.

History

Volume

45

Issue

6

Start Page

1750

End Page

1770

Number of Pages

21

eISSN

1468-263X

ISSN

0045-3102

Location

Oxford

Publisher

Oxford University Press

Language

en-aus

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

External Author Affiliations

Appleton Institute for Behavioural Sciences; Learning and Teaching Education Research Centre (LTERC); Not affiliated to a Research Institute; Queensland University of Technology; School of Human, Health and Social Sciences (2013- );

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

British journal of social work.