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Short-term effects of organo-mineral biochar and organic fertilisers on nitrogen cycling, plant photosynthesis, and nitrogen use efficiency

journal contribution
posted on 13.07.2018, 00:00 by TTN Nguyen, HM Wallace, Chengyuan Xu, Z Xu, MB Farrar, S Joseph, L Van Zwieten, Shahla Hosseini Bai
Purpose: Organo-mineral biochar fertiliser has the potential to replace conventional biochar and organic fertiliser to improve soil quality and increase plant photosynthesis. This study explored mechanisms involved in nitrogen (N) cycling in both soil and ginger plants (Zingiber officinale: Zingiberaceae) following different treatments including organic fertiliser, commercial bamboo biochar fertiliser, and organo-mineral biochar fertiliser. Materials and methods: Soil received four treatments including (1) commercial organic fertiliser (5 t ha−1) as the control, (2) commercial bamboo biochar fertiliser (5 t ha−1), (3) organo-mineral biochar fertiliser at a low rate (3 t ha−1), and (4) organo-mineral biochar fertiliser at a high rate (7.5 t ha−1). C and N fractions of soil and plant, and gas exchange measurements were analysed. Results and discussion: Initially, organo-mineral biochar fertiliser applied at the low rate increased leaf N. Organo-mineral biochar fertiliser applied at the high rate significantly increased N use efficiency (NUE) of the aboveground biomass compared with other treatments and improved photosynthesis compared with the control. There was N fractionation during plant N uptake and assimilation since the15N enrichment between the root, leaf, and stem were significantly different from zero; however, treatments did not affect this N fractionation. Conclusions: Organo-mineral biochar fertiliser has agronomic advantages over inorganic and raw organic (manure-based) N fertiliser because it allows farmer to put high concentrations of nutrients into soil without restricting N availability, N uptake, and plant photosynthesis. We recommend applying the low rate of organo-mineral biochar fertiliser as a substitute for commercial organic fertiliser. © 2017, Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany.

Funding

Other

History

Volume

17

Issue

12

Start Page

2763

End Page

2774

Number of Pages

12

eISSN

1614-7480

ISSN

1439-0108

Publisher

Springer, Germany

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

Acceptance Date

19/09/2017

External Author Affiliations

University of New England; Southern Cross University; NSW Department of Primary Industries; University of New South Wales; Griffith University; Hanoi University of Natural Resources and Environment; University of the Sunshine Coast

Author Research Institute

Institute for Future Farming Systems

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

Journal of Soils and Sediments

Exports