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Review of flowering control in industrial hemp

journal contribution
posted on 06.12.2017, 00:00 by John Hall, Surya Bhattarai, David Midmore
Hemp ( Cannabis sativa L.) is a dioecious annual that commences its reproductive cycle when photoperiods are shorter than a critical length. Photoperiod-sensitive varieties grown in low latitudes with short-day lengths tend to produce early flowering, short plants affecting the yield and quality of the fiber. The photoperiodic sensitivity of the crop could be controlled by the activation or deactivation of genes triggered by the change in light duration perceived by photoreceptive pigments. The sexual dimorphism of Cannabisis genetically determined by the XY chromosomal mechanismal though sexual morphology is primarily a result of endogenous plant growth regulator levels that fluctuate in response to environmental variables. Occurrence of occasional hermaphroditic flowers and monoecious plants are probably the result of these fluctuations. Understanding the mechanisms of photoperiodicity and sexual inheritance contributes to advances in breeding and crop management that may underpin the expansion of the commercial cultivation of the crop in nontraditional agroecological domains.

Funding

Category 3 - Industry and Other Research Income

History

Volume

9

Issue

1

Start Page

23

End Page

36

Number of Pages

14

eISSN

1544-046X

ISSN

1544-0478

Location

United Kingdom

Publisher

Taylor & Francis Group

Language

en-aus

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

External Author Affiliations

Centre for Plant and Water Science; Institute for Resource Industries and Sustainability (IRIS);

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

Journal of natural fibers.