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Review: Livestock production increasingly influences wildlife across the globe

journal contribution
posted on 23.09.2021, 04:24 authored by Iain GordonIain Gordon
With the growing human population, and their improving wealth, it is predicted that there will be significant increases in demand for livestock products (mainly meat and milk). Recent years have demonstrated that the growth in livestock production has generally had significant impacts on wildlife worldwide; and these are, usually, negative. Here I review the interactions between livestock and wildlife and assess the mechanisms through which these interactions occur. The review is framed within the context of the socio-ecological system whereby people are as much a part of the interaction between livestock and wildlife as the animal species themselves. I highlight areas of interaction that are mediated through effects on the forage supply (vegetation) - neutral, positive and negative - however, the review broadly analyses the impacts of livestock production activities. The evidence suggests that it is not the interaction between the species themselves but the ancillary activities associated with livestock production (e.g. land use change, removal of predators, provision of water points) that are the major factors affecting the outcome for wildlife. So in future, there are two key issues that need to be addressed - first, we need to intensify livestock production in areas of 'intensive' livestock production in order to reduce the pressure for land use change to meet the demand for meat (land sparing). And second, if wildlife is to survive in areas where livestock production dominates, it will have to be the people part of the socio-ecological system that sees the benefits of having wildlife co-exist with livestock on farming lands (land sharing and win-win).

History

Volume

12

Issue

s2

Start Page

S372

End Page

S382

Number of Pages

11

eISSN

1751-732X

ISSN

1751-7311

Location

England

Publisher

Elsevier

Language

eng

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

Yes

Acceptance Date

03/05/2018

Era Eligible

Yes

Medium

Print-Electronic

Journal

Animal