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Retinal photography screening programs to prevent vision loss from diabetic retinopathy in rural and urban Australia: a review

journal contribution
posted on 06.12.2017, 00:00 by R Tapp, J Svoboda, Bronwyn FredericksBronwyn Fredericks, A Jackson, H Taylor
Purpose: This review assessed the effectiveness of diabetic retinopathy (DR) screening programs, using retinal photography in Australian urban and rural settings, and considered implications for public health strategy and policy. Methods: An electronic search of MEDLINE, PubMed, and Embase for studies published between 1 January1996 and the 30 June 2013 was undertaken. Key search terms were ‘‘diabetic retinopathy,’’ ‘‘screening,’’ ‘‘retinal photography’’ and ‘‘Australia.’ ’Results: Twelve peer-reviewed publications were identified. The 14 DR screening programs identified from the12 publications were successfully undertaken in urban, rural and remote communities across Australia. Locations included a pathology collection center, and Indigenous primary health care and Aboriginal community controlled organizations. Each intervention using retinal photography was highly effective at increasing the number of people who underwent screening for DR. The review identified that prior to commencement of the screening programs a median of 48% (range 16–85%) of those screened had not undergone a retinal examination within the recommended time frame (every year for Indigenous people and every 2 years for non-Indigenous people in Australia). A median of 16% (range 0–45%) of study participants had evidence of DR. Conclusions: This review has shown there have been many pilot and demonstration projects in rural and urban Australia that confirm the effectiveness of retinal photography-based screening for DR.

History

Volume

22

Issue

1

Start Page

52

End Page

59

Number of Pages

8

eISSN

1744-5086

ISSN

0928-6586

Location

United Kingdom

Publisher

Taylor & Francis

Language

en-aus

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

Cultural Warning

This research output may contain the names and images of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people now deceased. We apologize for any distress that may occur.

External Author Affiliations

Australian College of Optometry; Centre for Tourism and Regional Opportunities (2015- ); Office of Indigenous Engagement; Royal Group of Hospitals; University of Melbourne;

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

Ophthalmic epidemiology.