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Reconceptualising relocation for specialist treatment: insights from New Zealand

journal contribution
posted on 06.12.2017, 00:00 by Pamela Mcgrath, Hamish Holewa
Purpose: To date, the research on relocation has been conducted in countries such as Australia where there are vast distances that need to be travelled by regional, rural and remote patients to access specialist metropolitan treatment. This research considers the issue of relocation for specialist treatment in a New Zealand context. Methods: The exploration of the experience of relocation from the consumers’ perspective was conducted through an iterative, qualitative research methodology using open-ended interviews conducted by speaker-phone at the time and location of each participant’s choice. Results: The three factors that underpin the phenomenon of ‘travel-based’ accommodation in New Zealand are the strong desire to return home, the small geographical distances that make this possible for many and the strong determination to endure hardship associated with travel when distances are long. Conclusions: Any understanding of relocation for specialist treatment needs to be informed by two concepts: ‘travel-based’ relocation and ‘accommodation-based’ relocation. Relevance of manuscript to inform research, policies and/or programs: The focus needs to be on providing supportive travel arrangements where possible. In New Zealand, as elsewhere, cancer supportive care organisations are increasingly providing volunteers to assist with travel. Such practical volunteer assistance is important, as is financial support through government subsidies to cover the cost of such travel. The insights from the study affirm the importance of health professionals who are supportive and creative in their efforts to assist people to return home. Supportive clinical care such as addressing issues in relation to nausea and pain management for those travelling must also be considered.

Funding

Category 1 - Australian Competitive Grants (this includes ARC, NHMRC)

History

Issue

2011

Start Page

499

End Page

505

Number of Pages

7

eISSN

1433-7339

ISSN

0941-4355

Location

Germany

Publisher

Springer

Language

en-aus

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

External Author Affiliations

Faculty of Sciences, Engineering and Health; Griffith University; Institute for Health and Social Science Research (IHSSR); International Program of Psycho-Social Health Research;

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

Supportive care in cancer.

Exports