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Professional female athletes are at a heightened risk of iron-deficient erythropoiesis compared with nonathletes

journal contribution
posted on 29.05.2020, 00:00 by N Ponorac, M Popović, D Karaba-Jakovljević, Z Bajić, Aaron Scanlan, E Stojanović, D Radovanović
This study primarily aimed to quantify and compare iron status in professional female athletes and nonathletes. Furthermore, this study also aimed to identify differences in iron status according to sporting discipline and explore the relationship between ferritin concentration and weekly training volume in professional athletes. A total of 152 participants were included in this study, including 85 athletes who were members of senior teams (handball, n = 24; volleyball, n = 36; soccer, n = 19; and judo, n = 6) involved at the highest level of competition and 67 nonathletes. A significantly greater proportion (p = .05) of athletes (27%) demonstrated iron-deficient erythropoiesis (IDE) compared with nonathletes (13%). There were nonsignificant differences (p > .05) in the prevalence of iron deficiency (ID; 49% vs. 46%) and iron deficiency anemia (IDA; 2% vs. 4%) between athletes and nonathletes. Similarly, the prevalence of ID, IDE, and IDA was not significantly different between sports (p > .05). Furthermore, training volume was negatively correlated with ferritin concentration in athletes (r: −.464, moderate, p < .001). Professional female athletes are at a heightened risk of IDE compared with nonathletes; therefore, they should be periodically screened for ID to reduce the deleterious effects on training and performance. The similar prevalence of ID, IDE, and IDA found across athletes competing in different sports suggests that overlaps exist between handball, volleyball, soccer, and judo athletes regarding risk of disturbance in iron metabolism. © 2020 Human Kinetics, Inc.

History

Volume

30

Issue

1

Start Page

48

End Page

53

Number of Pages

6

eISSN

1543-2742

ISSN

1526-484X

Publisher

Human Kinetics

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

External Author Affiliations

University of Banja Luka, Bosnia; University of Novi Sad; University of Nis;, Serbia

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism

Exports

CQUniversity

Exports