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Predictive factors of the general public’s willingness to be seen and seek treatment from a nurse practitioner in Australia: A cross-sectional national survey

journal contribution
posted on 27.08.2021, 05:17 by Trudy DwyerTrudy Dwyer, Alison Craswell, Matthew BrowneMatthew Browne
Background: Health care delivery in Australia is experiencing challenges with services struggling to keep up with the increasing demands of an aging population, rising levels of chronic disease and limited funding for care. Where adjunct models of health care such as the Nurse Practitioner (NP) have the potential to address this gap, in Australia, they remain an underutilised service. Clarifying the nature of the consumers ‘willingness’ to be seen by NPs warrants further investigation. Methods: Australia-wide, cross-sectional population-based survey was undertaken using computer-assisted telephone interviewing technique. Results: While just over 53% of the general public participants (n = 1318) had heard of an NP, once they became aware of their scope of practice, the majority agreed or strongly agreed they were willing to be seen by an NP in the community (91.6%), the emergency department 88.2%), to manage chronic conditions (86%), to have scrips written and referrals made (85.3%), and if they did not have to wait so long to see a medical doctor (81%). Factors significantly predicting willingness were being: female, less than 65 years of age, native English speakers, or residents from town/regional and rural settings. Conclusion: Despite limited awareness of the NP role, a large proportion of the Australian population, across different demographic groups, are willing to be seen and treated by an NP. Expansion of this role to support medical services in areas of need could improve healthcare delivery.

Funding

Category 2 - Other Public Sector Grants Category

History

Volume

19

Issue

1

Start Page

1

End Page

11

Number of Pages

11

eISSN

1478-4491

ISSN

1478-4491

Location

England

Publisher

BMC

Publisher License

CC BY

Additional Rights

CC BY 4.0

Language

eng

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

Yes

Acceptance Date

01/02/2021

External Author Affiliations

University of the Sunshine Coast

Era Eligible

Yes

Medium

Electronic

Journal

Human Resources for Health

Article Number

21