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Predicting success in an online parenting intervention: the role of child, parent, and family factors

journal contribution
posted on 28.07.2021, 00:31 by Cassandra DittmanCassandra Dittman, Susan P Farruggia, Melanie L Palmer, Matthew R Sanders, Louise J Keown
The present study involved an examination of the extent to which a wide range of child, parent, family, and program-related factors predicted child behavior and parenting outcomes after participation in an 8-session online version of the Triple P-Positive Parenting Program. Participants were mothers and fathers of 97 children aged between 3 and 8 years displaying elevated levels of disruptive behavior problems. For both mothers and fathers, poorer child behavior outcomes at postintervention were predicted by the number of sessions of the intervention completed by the family. For mothers, postintervention child behavior was also predicted by the quality of the mother-child relationship at baseline; for fathers, baseline child behavior severity was an additional predictor. Mothers' postintervention ineffective parenting was predicted by session completion and preintervention levels of ineffective parenting, whereas the only predictor of fathers' ineffective parenting at postintervention was preintervention levels of ineffective parenting. Socioeconomic risk, parental adjustment, and father participation in the intervention were not significant predictors of mother- or father-reported treatment outcomes. The implications of the findings for the provision of online parenting support are discussed.

History

Volume

28

Issue

2

Start Page

236

End Page

243

Number of Pages

8

eISSN

1939-1293

ISSN

0893-3200

Location

United States

Publisher

American Psychological Association

Language

eng

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

Acceptance Date

27/11/2013

External Author Affiliations

The University of Auckland, NZ; The University of Queensland

Era Eligible

Yes

Medium

Print-Electronic

Journal

Journal of Family Psychology