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Physical and psychosocial wellbeing of nurses in a regional Queensland hospital

journal contribution
posted on 06.12.2017, 00:00 by Brenda Happell, Cadeyrn Gaskin, Kerry Reid-Searl, Trudy Dwyer
Occupational stress is common among nurses. Two factors that may influence stress levels are diet and physical activity. The purpose of this study was to investigate the diets and physical activity levels of nurses and to quantify the relationships between these behaviours and anxiety, depressed mood, stress, and burnout. Nurses (N = 52) from one regional hospital completed a survey assessing physical activity, nutrition, and psychological functioning. Almost two-thirds (65%) of participants had met recommended levels of both moderate and vigorous physical activity in the week prior. Participants met recommended levels for fruit, but not vegetable, consumption. Burnout and stress levels were close to norms for physicians and nurses. Scores for depressed mood, anxiety, and stress symptoms were within one standard deviation of norms for the Australian adult population. Several moderately sized correlations were found between the psychological constructs measured and both physical activity and nutrition. Although most of the participants were physically active and seemed to be consuming nutritious diets, some nurses may need encouragement to adopt similarly healthy behaviours.© 2013 Australian College of Nursing Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

Funding

Category 2 - Other Public Sector Grants Category

History

Volume

21

Issue

1

Start Page

71

End Page

78

Number of Pages

8

eISSN

1876-7575

ISSN

1322-7696

Location

Netherlands

Publisher

Elsevier

Language

en-aus

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

External Author Affiliations

Institute for Health and Social Science Research (IHSSR); School of Nursing and Midwifery (2013- );

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

Collegian.

Exports

CQUniversity

Exports