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Perceived human resource management and presenteeism: Mediating effect of turnover intentions

journal contribution
posted on 27.08.2019, 00:00 by MD Amlan Haque, M Fernando, P Caputi
Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the mediating effect of employee turnover intentions (ETI) on the relationship between perceived human resource management (PHRM) and presenteeism. The notion of presenteeism is described as coming to work when unwell and unable to work with full capacity. Design/methodology/approach: Using social exchange theory and structured equation modelling, hypotheses were tested using responses from 200 full-time Australian employees. Findings: The results show that employees’ PHRM significantly influenced presenteeism and ETI. As predicted, PHRM negatively influenced presenteeism and ETI positively influenced presenteeism. The direct influence of PHRM on presenteeism was fully mediated by ETI. Practical implications: This paper suggests that organisations expecting to address presenteeism by promoting PHRM may experience an adverse result when employees conceal turnover intentions. Social implications: Form the perspective of social exchange, this study focuses on ETI as a mediating variable and sheds light on employees’ hidden attitudes about their jobs to explain how PHRM can influence presenteeism in Australia. Consequently, the findings should help both organisations and employees to identify ways that PHRM can reduce presenteeism. Originality/value: This paper examines the unique meditational role of ETI in the relationship between PHRM and presenteeism, which is an area of inquiry that has not been fully examined in the literature of HRM. In addition, it examines presenteeism among Australian employees in relation to PHRM. © 2019, Emerald Publishing Limited.

History

Volume

11

Issue

2

Start Page

110

End Page

130

Number of Pages

21

eISSN

1757-4331

ISSN

1757-4323

Publisher

Emerald, UK

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

Acceptance Date

24/04/2019

External Author Affiliations

University of Wollongong

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

Asia-Pacific Journal of Business Administration

Exports