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Patterns of diet, physical activity, sitting and sleep are associated with socio-demographic, behavioural, and health-risk indicators in adults

journal contribution
posted on 30.01.2020, 00:00 by S Oftedal, Corneel Vandelanotte, MJ Duncan
Our understanding of how multiple health-behaviours co-occur is in its infancy. This study aimed to: (1) identify patterns of physical activity, diet, sitting, and sleep; and (2) examine the association between sociodemographic and health-risk indicators. Pooled data from annual cross-sectional telephone surveys of Australian adults (2015–2017, n = 3374, 51.4% women) were used. Participants self-reported physical activity, diet, sitting-time, sleep/rest insufficiency, sociodemographic characteristics, smoking, alcohol use, height and weight to calculate body mass index (BMI), and mental distress frequency. Latent class analysis identified health-behaviour classes. Latent class regression determined the associations between health-behaviour patterns, sociodemographic, and health-risk indicators. Three latent classes were identified. Relative to a ‘moderate lifestyle’ pattern (men: 43.2%, women: 38.1%), a ‘poor lifestyle’ pattern (men: 19.9%, women: 30.5%) was associated with increased odds of a younger age, smoking, BMI ≥ 30.0 kg/m2, frequent mental distress (men and women), non-partnered status (men only), a lower Socioeconomic Index for Areas centile, primary/secondary education only, and BMI = 25.0–29.9 kg/m2 (women only). An ‘active poor sleeper’ pattern (men: 37.0%, women: 31.4%) was associated with increased odds of a younger age (men and women), working and frequent mental distress (women only), relative to a ‘moderate lifestyle’ pattern. Better understanding of how health-behaviour patterns influence future health status is needed. Targeted interventions jointly addressing these behaviours are a public health priority. © 2019 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.

Funding

Category 2 - Other Public Sector Grants Category

History

Volume

16

Issue

13

Start Page

1

End Page

14

Number of Pages

14

eISSN

1660-4601

ISSN

1661-7827

Publisher

MDPI AG, Switzerland

Additional Rights

CC BY 4.0

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

Yes

Acceptance Date

01/07/2019

External Author Affiliations

University of Newcastle

Author Research Institute

Appleton Institute

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health

Usage metrics

CQUniversity

Licence

Exports