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Nurses' perceptions of risk from emerging respiratory infectious diseases: A Singapore study

journal contribution
posted on 29.11.2018, 00:00 by Y Koh, Desley Hegney, V Drury
The recent emergence of virulent respiratory infectious diseases such as Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) and Influenza A/H1N1 viruses predisposes nurses to occupational risks. This qualitative study investigated how Chinese Singaporean nurses perceived the risks of exposure to these infectious diseases and the factors that influenced this risk perception. Data were collected through face-to-face interviews and were analyzed using Braun and Clarke’s process of thematic analysis. Three themes emerged: living with risk; the experience of SARS; and acceptance of risk. The nature of nursing work was perceived to place participants at risk of infection. Another significant finding of this study is that the government’s, organizations’ and nurses’ perceptions of new emerging respiratory infectious diseases were influenced by their previous experience with SARS. Similar to previous studies, nurses working at the ‘front line’ believed that infection from these diseases was an unavoidable occupational hazard.

History

Volume

18

Issue

2

Start Page

195

End Page

204

Number of Pages

10

eISSN

1440-172X

ISSN

1322-7114

Publisher

Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

External Author Affiliations

National University of Singapore; The University of Western Australia

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

International Journal of Nursing Practice

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