File(s) not publicly available

Novel method for assessing the en route survivorship of biofouling organisms on various vessel types

journal contribution
posted on 06.12.2017, 00:00 by A Coutts, M Taylor, Chad HewittChad Hewitt
Shipping is considered the single largest vector for the human-mediated movement of non-indigenous marine species (NIMS) around the world (e.g., Ruiz et al., 1997; Minchin and Gollasch, 2002). A variety of shipping mechanisms (e.g., ballast and bilge water discharges, biofouling, de-fouling, sea-chests, sea-sieves, anchors, chain lockers and piping; see Carlton et al., 1995; Schormann et al., 1990) are capable of transporting NIMS to new locations. Biofouling or hull fouling is now being acknowledged as one of the single most important dispersal mechanisms alongside ballast water (e.g., Cranfield et al., 1998; Thresher et al., 1999; Hewitt, 2002;Gollasch, 2002;Hewitt et al., 2004).

History

Volume

54

Start Page

97

End Page

100

Number of Pages

4

eISSN

1879-3363

ISSN

0025-326X

Location

United Kingdom

Publisher

Elsevier Ltd

Language

en-aus

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

External Author Affiliations

Australian Maritime College; Cawthron Institute;

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

Marine pollution bulletin.

Usage metrics

Exports