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Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae : pathogenesis and prevention

journal contribution
posted on 06.12.2017, 00:00 by A Foxwell, Jennelle KydJennelle Kyd, A Cripps
Respiratory tract infections associated with nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi) are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in both developed and nonindustrialized nations. The success of this organism as a colonizer and pathogen is due to its lack of reliance on any single mechanism of attachment and its ability to respond rapidly to host defense mechanisms by antigenic variation of proteins and enzymes. First we review the interaction between NTHi and the human host, with particular emphasis on mechanisms of adhesion, increased mucin production, and evasion of host defenses via immunoglobulin A (IgA) proteases, epithelial cell entry, and antigenic variation. Then we review vaccine strategies with emphasis on the potential of outer membrane components of NTHi to stimulate appropriate humoral and cellular immune mechanisms for prevention of infection or immunomodulation of chronically infected individuals.

Funding

Category 1 - Australian Competitive Grants (this includes ARC, NHMRC)

History

Volume

62

Issue

2

Start Page

294

End Page

308

Number of Pages

15

eISSN

1070-6275

ISSN

1092-2172

Location

United States

Publisher

American Society for Microbiology

Language

en-aus

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

External Author Affiliations

University of Canberra;

Era Eligible

No

Journal

Microbiology and molecular biology reviews.

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