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Meta-analysis of facial affect recognition difficulties after traumatic brain injury

journal contribution
posted on 14.02.2019, 00:00 by DR Babbage, J Yim, Barbra Zupan, D Neumann, MR Tomita, B Willer
Objective: Difficulties in communication and social relationships present a formidable challenge for many people after traumatic brain injury (TBI). These difficulties are likely to be partially attributable to problems with emotion perception. Mounting evidence shows facial affect recognition to be particularly difficult after TBI. However, no attempt has been made to systematically estimate the magnitude of this problem or the frequency with which it occurs. Method: A meta-analysis is presented examining the magnitude of facial affect recognition difficulties after TBI. From this, the frequency of these impairments in the TBI population is estimated. Effect sizes were calculated from 13 studies that compared adults with moderate to severe TBI to matched healthy controls on static measures of facial affect recognition. Results: The studies collectively presented data from 296 adults with TBI and 296 matched controls. The overall weighted mean effect size for the 13 studies was -1.11, indicating people with TBI on average perform about 1.1 SD below healthy peers on measures of facial affect recognition. Based on estimation of the TBI population standard deviation and modeling of likely distribution shape, it is estimated that between 13% and 39% of people with moderate to severe TBI may have significant difficulties with facial affect recognition, depending on the cut-off criterion used. Conclusion: This is clearly an area that warrants attention, particularly examining techniques for the rehabilitation of these deficits. © 2011 American Psychological Association.

Funding

Other

History

Volume

25

Issue

3

Start Page

277

End Page

285

Number of Pages

9

eISSN

1931-1559

ISSN

0894-4105

Publisher

American Psychological Association

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

External Author Affiliations

Massey University, NZ; Indiana University, USA; State University of New York at Buffalo

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

Neuropsychology

Exports