File(s) not publicly available

Long-haul pilots use in-flight napping as a countermeasure to fatigue

journal contribution
posted on 06.12.2017, 00:00 by Gregory RoachGregory Roach, Drew DawsonDrew Dawson, T Sletten, David DarwentDavid Darwent
The aim of this study was to examine the effects of fatigue on the amount of in-flight sleep obtained by airline pilots during long-haul duty periods. A total of 301 pilots collected sleep/wake and work/rest data for a period of at least 2 weeks each. Fatigue likelihood, i.e. low, moderate, high, or extreme, was estimated for each duty period based on a pilot’s sleep/wake behaviour prior to duty and the time of day that the duty period occurred. Participants obtained 1.8 h of sleep (i.e. 27% of their rest time) during duty periods with low fatigue likelihood and 3.7 h of sleep (i.e. 54% of their rest time) during duty periods with extreme fatigue likelihood. These results indicate that (i) long-haul pilots obtain substantially more sleep during duty periods when fatigue is likely to be extreme than when fatigue is likely to be low and (ii) long-haul pilots use in-flight napping as a fatigue countermeasure, but more could be done to increase its efficacy.

Funding

Category 1 - Australian Competitive Grants (this includes ARC, NHMRC)

History

Volume

42

Issue

2

Start Page

214

End Page

218

Number of Pages

5

ISSN

0003-6870

Location

United Kingdom

Publisher

Elsevier

Language

en-aus

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

External Author Affiliations

Centre for Sleep Research; Monash University;

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

Applied ergonomics : human factors in technology and society.

Usage metrics

Exports