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Life course analysis of gambling trajectories: An Indigenous Australian study

journal contribution
posted on 29.10.2018, 00:00 by H Breen, Nerilee Hing
© 2014, © 2014 Taylor & Francis. Traditional card gambling is a culturally acceptable recreational activity for generations of Indigenous Australians. Commercial gambling activities are popular as well. This study drew on a life course approach and a sample of 57 Indigenous Australian people to examine their gambling trajectories over time that resulted in recreational gambling or in disordered gambling. To gain in-depth insight into various gambling trajectories, this study used an interpretative phenomenological methodology. At early childhood, teenage, young adult and mature adult stages, major gambling influences appeared as dependence, independence, timing of major shifts and transitions, and rationalization, respectively. The study showed that being a recreational or disordered gambler was a shifting or fluctuating position, subject to transitions and events in people's lives rather than a one-way path in either direction. Within a complex cultural environment, the dynamic interplay between social density, context and individual choice appears to influence gambling trajectories for these Indigenous Australians.

Funding

Category 1 - Australian Competitive Grants (this includes ARC, NHMRC)

History

Volume

14

Issue

3

Start Page

357

End Page

373

Number of Pages

17

eISSN

1479-4276

ISSN

1445-9795

Publisher

Routledge

Peer Reviewed

Yes

Open Access

No

Cultural Warning

This research output may contain the names and images of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people now deceased. We apologize for any distress that may occur.

External Author Affiliations

Southern Cross University

Era Eligible

Yes

Journal

International Gambling Studies

Exports